Annual report pursuant to Section 13 and 15(d)

Significant Accounting Policies (Policies)

v3.20.4
Significant Accounting Policies (Policies)
12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Accounting Policies [Abstract]  
Basis of Presentation

Basis of Presentation

The accompanying consolidated financial statements and related notes have been prepared in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States of America (“GAAP”) and pursuant to the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”).

Our operations are organized into a single business segment, which consists of hydraulic fracturing services, and we have one reportable geographical business segment, the United States.

Principles of Consolidation

Principles of Consolidation

The consolidated financial statements comprise the financial statements of the Company, its wholly owned subsidiaries, and subsidiaries that it controls due to ownership of a majority voting interest. Subsidiaries are fully consolidated from the date of acquisition, being the date on which the Company obtains control, and continue to be consolidated until the date when such control ceases. The financial statements of the subsidiaries are prepared for the same reporting period as the Company. All significant intercompany balances and transactions are eliminated upon consolidation.

Use of Estimates

Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the financial statements and accompanying notes. We regularly evaluate estimates and judgments based on historical experience and other relevant facts and circumstances. Significant estimates included in these financial statements primarily relate to allowance for doubtful accounts, allowance for inventory obsolescence, useful lives for depreciation and amortization of property and equipment and intangibles, impairment assessments of goodwill and long-lived assets, Level 2 inputs used in fair value estimation of term loans and certain liability-classified share-based compensation, and the assumptions used in our Black-Scholes and Monte Carlo option pricing models associated with the valuation of share-based compensation and certain equity instruments. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

Cash and Cash Equivalents

Cash and Cash Equivalents

Cash equivalents are highly liquid investments with an original maturity at the date of acquisition of three months or less. Cash and cash equivalents consist of cash on deposit with domestic banks and, at times, may exceed federally insured limits.

Restricted Cash

Restricted Cash

 

Cash and cash equivalents that are restricted as to withdrawal or use under the terms of certain contractual agreements, or are reserved for a specific purpose, that are not readily available for immediate or general use are recorded in restricted cash in our consolidated balance sheets. The restricted cash in our consolidated balance sheet represents cash transferred into a trust account to support our workers’ compensation obligations and cash held for use in approved capital expenditures amounting to $513 and $1,056, respectively, as of December 31, 2020, and $513 and $7,097, respectively, as of December 31, 2019.

 

The following table provides a reconciliation of the amount of cash and cash equivalents reported on the consolidated balance sheets to the total of cash and cash equivalents and restricted cash shown on the consolidated statements of cash flows:

 

 

 

As of December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

3,693

 

 

$

33,794

 

Restricted cash

 

 

1,569

 

 

 

7,610

 

Cash and cash equivalents and restricted cash

 

$

5,262

 

 

$

41,404

 

 

Inventory

Inventory

Inventory consists of proppant, chemicals, and other consumable materials and supplies used in our high-pressure hydraulic fracturing operations. Inventories are stated at the lower of cost or net realizable value. Cost is determined principally on a first-in-first-out cost basis. All inventories are purchased and used by the Company in the delivery of its services with no inventory being sold separately to outside parties. Inventory quantities on hand are reviewed regularly and write-downs for obsolete inventory are recorded based on our forecast of the inventory item demand in the near future. As of December 31, 2020 and 2019, the Company had established inventory reserves of $315 and $579, respectively, for obsolete and slow-moving inventory. The following table shows the change in the inventory reserves:

 

 

 

As of December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

Balance at beginning of period

 

$

579

 

 

$

572

 

Charges to costs and expenses

 

 

620

 

 

 

359

 

Recoveries and write-offs

 

 

(884

)

 

 

(352

)

Balance at end of period

 

$

315

 

 

$

579

 

 

Property and Equipment

Property and Equipment

Property and equipment are carried at cost, with depreciation provided on a straight-line basis over their estimated useful lives. Expenditures for renewals and betterments that extend the lives of the assets are capitalized. Amounts spent for maintenance and repairs, which do not improve or extend the life of the related asset, are charged to expense as incurred.

The Company separately identifies and accounts for certain critical components of its hydraulic fracturing units including the engine, transmission, and pump, which requires us to separately estimate the useful lives of these components. For our other service equipment, we do not separately identify and track depreciation of specific original components. When we replace components of these assets, we typically estimate the net book values of the components that are retired, which are based primarily upon their replacement costs, their ages, and their original estimated useful lives.

In the first quarter of 2020, our review of impairment of long-lived assets (refer to “Note 5 – Goodwill and Intangible Assets”) necessitated a review of the useful lives of our property and equipment. Current trends in hydraulic fracturing equipment operating conditions, such as increasing treating pressures and higher pumping rates, along with the increase in daily pumping time are shortening the useful life of certain critical components we use. We determined that the

average useful life of fluid ends and fuel injectors is now less than one year, resulting in our determination that costs associated with the replacement of these components will no longer be capitalized, but instead expensed as they are used in operations. This change in accounting estimate was made effective in March 2020 and accounted for prospectively.

Long-lived Assets

Long-lived Assets

Long-lived assets, such as property and equipment and amortizable identifiable intangible assets are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. When making this assessment, the following factors are considered: current operating results, trends, and prospects, as well as the effects of obsolescence, demand, competition, and other economic factors. We determine recoverability by evaluating whether the undiscounted estimated future net cash flows of the asset or asset group are less than its carrying value. When impairment is indicated, we proceed to Step 2 of the impairment test and measure the impairment as the amount by which the assets carrying value exceeds its fair value. Management considers several factors such as estimated future cash flows, appraisals, and current market value analysis in determining fair value. Assets are written down to fair value if the concluded current fair value is below the net carrying value. Impairment loss on long-lived assets of $147,543 was recorded during the first quarter of 2020 (refer to “Note 5 – Goodwill and Intangible Assets”).

Goodwill

Goodwill

Goodwill is not amortized, but is reviewed for impairment annually, or more frequently when events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value may not be recoverable. Judgements regarding indicators of potential impairment are based on market conditions and operational performance of the business.

As of December 31 of each year, or as required, the Company performs an impairment analysis of goodwill. The Company may assess its goodwill for impairment initially using a qualitative approach to determine whether conditions exist that indicate it is more likely than not that a reporting unit’s carrying value is greater than its fair value, and if such conditions are identified, then a quantitative analysis will be performed to determine if there is any impairment. The Company may also elect to perform a single step quantitative analysis in which the carrying amount of the reporting unit is compared to its fair value, which the Company estimates using a guideline public company method, a form of the market approach. The guideline public company method utilized the trading multiples of similarly traded public companies as they related to the Company’s operating metrics. An impairment charge would be recognized for the amount by which the carrying amount of the reporting unit exceeds the reporting unit’s fair value, and only limited to the total amount of goodwill allocated to the reporting unit.

Deferred Financing Costs

Deferred Financing Costs

Costs incurred to obtain financing are capitalized and amortized to interest expense using the effective interest method over the contractual term of the debt. At the balance sheet date, deferred financing costs related to term loans are presented as a direct deduction from the debt liability, while deferred financing costs related to the revolver facility are presented as deferred financing costs, net, on the consolidated balance sheets.

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

Fair value is defined under Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) 820, Fair Value Measurement, as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. ASC 820 also establishes a three-level hierarchy, which requires an entity to maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs when measuring fair value. The three levels are defined as follows:

Level 1–inputs are quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities.

Level 2–inputs other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly.

Level 3–inputs are unobservable for the asset or liability.

The following is a summary of the carrying amounts and estimated fair values of our financial instruments as of December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019:

Senior Secured Term Loan. The fair value of the Senior Secured Term Loan is $198.0 million and approximates carrying value

as of December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively.

Equipment financing. The carrying value of the equipment financing approximates fair value as its terms are consistent with and comparable to current market rates as of December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively.

Revenue Recognition

Revenue Recognition

Effective January 1, 2019, the Company adopted ASC 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers, which outlines a single comprehensive model for entities to use in accounting for revenue arising from contracts with customers, using the modified retrospective method.  

Under the standard, revenue recognition is based on the customer’s ability to benefit from the services rendered in an amount that reflects the consideration expected to be received in exchange for those services. Taxes collected from customers and remitted to governmental authorities are accounted for on a net basis and therefore excluded from revenues in the Company’s financial statements.

The Company’s revenues consist of providing hydraulic fracturing services for either a pre-determined term or number of stages/wells to E&P companies operating in the onshore oil and natural gas basins of the United States. In the performance of these services, and at the request of our customers, we may also provide consumables such as chemicals and sand. Revenues are earned as services are rendered, which is generally on a per stage or daily rate basis. Customers are invoiced according to contract terms upon the completion of a well or monthly with payment due typically 30 days from invoice date.

Hydraulic fracturing is a well-stimulation technique intended to optimize hydrocarbon flow paths during the completion phase of wellbores. The process involves the injection of water, sand, and chemicals under high pressure into shale formations. The Company’s performance obligations are satisfied over time, typically measured in number of stages completed or the number of pumping days a fleet is available to pump for a customer in a month. A field ticket is created for each stage completed that records all services performed, including any chemicals and proppant we provided and consumed in completing the stage. The field ticket is signed by a customer representative and evidences the amounts to which the Company has a right to invoice and thus to recognize as revenue. All revenue is recognized when a contract with a customer exists, collectability of amounts subject to invoice is probable, the performance obligations under the contract have been satisfied over time, and the amount to which the Company has the right to invoice has been determined. A portion of the Company’s contracts contain variable consideration; however, this variable consideration is typically unknown at the time of contract inception, and is not known until the job is complete, at which time the variability is resolved.

The Company has elected to use the “as invoiced” practical expedient to recognize revenue based upon the amount it has a right to invoice upon the completion of each performance obligation per the terms of the contract. The practical expedient permits an entity to recognize revenue in the amount to which it has a right to invoice the customer if that amount corresponds directly with the value to the customer of the entity’s performance completed to date. The Company believes that this is an accurate reflection of the value transferred to the customer as each incremental obligation is performed.

The Company has elected to expense sales commissions paid upon the successful signing of a new customer contract as incurred if the related contract will be fully satisfied within one year. For contracts that will not be fully satisfied within one year, these incremental costs of obtaining a contract with a customer will be recognized as a contract asset and amortized on a straight-line basis over the life of the contract.

Accounts Receivable

Accounts Receivable

Accounts receivable are recorded at their outstanding balances adjusted for an allowance for doubtful accounts. The allowance for doubtful accounts is determined by analyzing the payment history and credit worthiness of each debtor. Receivable balances are charged off when they are considered uncollectible by management. Recoveries of receivables previously charged off are recorded as income when received. The Company held a reserve for doubtful accounts of $12,000 and $22 as of December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively. The reserve was recorded due to growing uncertainty as to collectability of billed amounts from customers weakened by the economic downturn in 2020. The following table shows the change in allowance for doubtful accounts:

 

 

 

 

As of December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

Balance at beginning of period

 

$

22

 

 

$

189

 

Charges to costs and expenses

 

 

12,031

 

 

 

434

 

Recoveries and write-offs

 

 

(53

)

 

 

(601

)

Balance at end of period

 

$

12,000

 

 

$

22

 

 

Major Customer and Concentration of Credit Risk

Major Customer and Concentration of Credit Risk

The concentration of our customers in the oil and natural gas industry may impact our overall exposure to credit risk, either positively or negatively, in that customers may be similarly affected by changes in economic and industry conditions. We perform ongoing credit evaluations of our customers and do not generally require collateral in support of our trade receivables.

 

The following table shows the percentage of revenues from our significant customers:

 

 

 

Years Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

Customer A

 

11.2%

 

 

18.4%

 

Customer B

 

19.7%

 

 

*

 

Customer C

 

18.4%

 

 

*

 

Customer D

 

*

 

 

18.3%

 

Customer E

 

13.2%

 

 

*

 

Customer F

 

18.2%

 

 

*

 

Customer G

 

*

 

 

15.7%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An asterisk indicates that revenue is less than ten percent.

 

 

The following table shows the percentage of trade receivables from our significant customers:

 

 

 

Years Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

Customer A

 

*

 

 

12.0%

 

Customer B

 

32.2%

 

 

10.3%

 

Customer C

 

17.0%

 

 

*

 

Customer D

 

*

 

 

12.1%

 

Customer E

 

*

 

 

*

 

Customer F

 

12.7%

 

 

*

 

Customer G

 

12.5%

 

 

34.5%

 

Customer H

 

*

 

 

15.9%

 

Customer I

 

13.5%

 

 

*

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An asterisk indicates that trade receivable is less than ten percent.

 

 

Share-Based Compensation

Share-Based Compensation

 

Share based compensation is measured on the grant date and fair value is recognized as expense over the requisite service period, which is generally the vesting period of the award. The Company recognizes forfeitures as they occur rather than estimating expected forfeitures.

 

The fair value of time-based restricted stock, DSUs, or other performance incentive awards is determined based on the number of shares or units granted and the closing price of Class A common stock on the date of grant. The fair value of stock options is determined by applying the Black-Sholes model on the grant-date market value of the underlying Class A common stock. Restricted stock with market conditions is valued using a Monte Carlo simulation analysis.

 

 

Deferred compensation expense associated with liability-based awards, such as certain performance incentive awards that could be settled either in cash or through issuance of a variable number of shares based on a fixed monetary amount at inception, is recognized at the fixed monetary amount at inception and is amortized on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period, which is generally the vesting period. However, the Company considers any delayed settlement as a post-vesting restriction which impacts the determination of the grant-date fair value of the award. The Company estimates fair value by using a risk-adjusted discount rate, which reflects the weighted average cost of capital of similarly traded public companies.

Fair Value of Preferred Stock

Fair Value of Preferred Stock

 

The fair value of Series A preferred stock at the date of issuance was estimated by calculating the present value of its one-year redemption cost to the Company and then discounted for lack of marketability.

 

The fair value of Series B preferred stock is the stated value, which is equal to the proceeds received from issuance.

Embedded Conversion Features

Embedded Conversion Features

 

The Company evaluates embedded conversion features within a convertible instrument under ASC 815, Derivatives and Hedging, to determine whether the embedded conversion feature(s) should be bifurcated from the host instrument and accounted for as a derivative at fair value with changes in fair value recorded in earnings. If the conversion feature does not require treatment under ASC 815, the instrument is evaluated under ASC 470-20, Debt with Conversion and Other Options, for consideration of any beneficial conversion features.

 

The Company records a beneficial conversion feature (“BCF”) when the convertible instrument is issued with conversion features at fixed or adjustable rates that are below market value when issued. The BCF for convertible instruments is recognized and measured by allocating a portion of the proceeds equal to the intrinsic value of that feature to additional paid-in capital. The intrinsic value is generally calculated at the commitment date as the difference between the conversion price and the fair value of the common stock or other securities into which the security is convertible, multiplied by the number of shares into which the security is convertible. If certain other securities are issued with the convertible security, the proceeds are allocated among the different components. The portion of the proceeds allocated to the convertible security is divided by the contractual number of the conversion shares to determine the effective conversion price, which is used to measure the BCF. The effective conversion price is used to compute the intrinsic value. The value of the BCF is limited to the basis that is initially allocated to the convertible security.

 

The BCF for the convertible instrument is recorded as a reduction, or discount, to the carrying amount of the convertible instrument equal to the fair value of the conversion feature. The discount is then amortized as deemed dividends over the period from the date of the convertible instrument’s issuance to the earliest redemption date, provided that the convertible instrument is not currently redeemable but probable of becoming redeemable in the future.

Warrants Issued with Convertible Instruments

Warrants Issued with Convertible Instruments

The Company calculates the fair value of warrants issued with the convertible instruments using the Black-Scholes valuation method. The Company allocates the value of the proceeds received from a convertible instrument transaction between the conversion feature and any other detachable instruments (such as warrants) on a relative fair value basis. The allocated fair value is recorded as discount or premium.

Income Taxes

Income Taxes

The Company, under ASC 740, uses the asset and liability method of accounting for income taxes, under which deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences of (i) temporary differences between the financial statement carrying amounts and the tax bases of existing assets and liabilities and (ii) operating loss and tax credit carryforwards. Deferred income tax assets and liabilities are based on enacted tax rates applicable to the future period when those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect of a change in tax rates on deferred tax assets and liabilities is recognized in income in the period the rate change is enacted. A valuation allowance is provided for deferred tax assets when it is more likely than not the deferred tax assets will not be realized. Our deferred tax calculation and valuation allowance requires us to make certain estimates about future operations. Changes in state or federal tax laws, as well as changes in our financial condition or the carrying value of existing assets and liabilities, could affect those estimates. The effect of a change in tax rates is recognized as income or expense in the period that the rate is enacted.

ASC 740 prescribes a recognition threshold and a measurement attribute for the financial statement recognition and measurement of tax positions taken or expected to be taken in a tax return. For those benefits to be recognized, a tax position must be more-likely-than-not to be sustained upon examination by taxing authorities. The Company recognizes accrued interest and penalties related to unrecognized tax benefits as income tax expense. No amounts were accrued for the payment of interest and penalties at December 31, 2020. The Company is currently not aware of any issues under review that could result in significant payments, accruals, or material deviation from its position. The Company is subject to income tax examinations by major taxing authorities since inception.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

Recently Adopted Accounting Pronouncements

 

The Company is an “emerging growth company,” as defined in Section 2(a) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, (the “Securities Act”), as modified by the Jumpstart our Business Startups Act of 2012 (the “JOBS Act”), and it may take advantage of certain exemptions from various reporting requirements that are applicable to other public companies that are not emerging growth companies including, but not limited to, not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation in its periodic reports and proxy statements, and exemptions from the requirements of holding a nonbinding advisory vote on executive compensation and shareholder approval of any golden parachute payments not previously approved.

 

Further, Section 102(b)(1) of the JOBS Act exempts emerging growth companies from being required to comply with new or revised financial accounting standards until private companies (that is, those that have not had a Securities Act registration statement declared effective or do not have a class of securities registered under the Exchange Act) are required to comply with the new or revised financial accounting standards. The JOBS Act provides that a company can elect to opt out of the extended transition period and comply with the requirements that apply to non-emerging growth companies but any such election to opt out is irrevocable. The Company has elected not to opt out of such extended transition period, which means that when a standard is issued or revised and it has different application dates for public or private companies, the Company, as an emerging growth company, can adopt the new or revised standard at the time private companies adopt the new or revised standard. This may make comparison of the Company’s financial statements with another public company which is neither an emerging growth company nor an emerging growth company which has opted out of using the extended transition period difficult or impossible because of the potential differences in accounting standards used.

In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-04, Intangibles - Goodwill and Other (Topic 350): Simplifying the Test for Goodwill Impairment, which eliminates the second step of the previous two-step quantitative test of goodwill impairment. Under the new guidance, the quantitative test consists of a single step in which the carrying amount of the reporting unit is compared to its fair value. An impairment charge would be recognized for the amount by which the carrying amount exceeds the reporting unit’s fair value; however, the amount of the impairment would be limited to the total amount of goodwill allocated to the reporting unit. The guidance does not affect the existing option to perform the qualitative assessment for a reporting unit to determine whether the quantitative impairment test is necessary. The new guidance will be effective for emerging growth companies for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2021; however, early adoption is permitted. The Company early adopted this guidance during the first quarter of 2020. The Company’s impairment analysis did not result in any impairment of goodwill.

 

In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-13, Fair Value Measurement (Topic 820): Disclosure Framework-Changes to the Disclosure Requirements for Fair Value Measurement, which amended the disclosure requirements under ASC 820. This update clarifies and unifies the disclosure of Level 3 fair value instruments. ASU 2018-13 became effective for the Company beginning on January 1, 2020. The Company’s adoption of this standard did not have a material impact on the consolidated financial statements.

 

In March 2020, the FASB issued ASU 2020-03, Codification Improvements to Financial Instruments, which improves and clarifies various financial instruments topics. ASU 2020-03 includes seven different issues, including the treatment of revolving debt arrangements, that describe the areas of improvement and the related amendments to GAAP that are intended to make the standards easier to understand and apply by eliminating inconsistencies and providing clarifications. This new guidance became effective for the Company immediately upon issuance. The adoption of this guidance did not have a material impact on the consolidated financial statements.

In June 2020, the FASB issued ASU 2020-05, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606) and Leases (Topic 842) -

Effective Dates for Certain Entities, which provided deferral of the effective dates for implementing previously issued Topic 606 and Topic 842 for one year to give some relief for businesses and the difficulties they are facing during the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic. The Company adopted Topic 606 on January 1, 2019. We expect to adopt Topic 842 using the effective date of January 1, 2022 as the date of our initial application of the standard.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements Not Yet Adopted

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842) and subsequent amendments to the initial guidance: ASU 2017-13, ASU 2018-10, ASU 2018-11, ASU 2018-20, ASU 2019-01 and ASU 2020-02 (collectively, Topic 842). Topic 842 requires companies to generally recognize on the balance sheet operating and financing lease liabilities and corresponding right-of-use assets. We expect to adopt Topic 842 using the effective date of January 1, 2022 as the date of our initial application of the standard. We are currently evaluating the impact of our adoption of Topic 842 on our consolidated financial statements. We expect that most of our operating lease commitments will be subject to the new standard and recognized as operating lease liabilities and right-of-use assets upon our adoption of Topic 842, which will increase our total assets and total liabilities that we report relative to such amounts prior to adoption. The Company will use the modified retrospective with applied transition method upon adoption of the standard. Under this adoption method, all leases that are in effect and in existence as of, and after transition date will be applied as of the transition date, with a cumulative impact to retained earnings in that period. Prior period financial statements would be stated under the old guidance ASC 840 with no change to prior periods or disclosures associated with prior period.

 

In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-13, Financial Instruments – Credit Losses (Topic 326), which changes the impairment model for most financial assets and certain other instruments. Specifically, this new guidance requires using a forward-looking, expected loss model for trade and other receivables, held-to-maturity debt securities, loans and other instruments. This will replace the currently used model and may result in an earlier recognition of allowance for losses. In addition, in November 2019, the FASB issued ASU 2019-11, Codification Improvements to Topic 326, Financial Instruments – Credit Losses, which clarifies guidance around how to report expected recoveries. The new guidance will be effective for emerging growth companies for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2022, including interim periods within those fiscal years. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of adopting the new guidance on the consolidated financial statements.

 

In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-15, Intangibles - Goodwill and Other - Internal-Use Software (Subtopic 350-40): Customer’s Accounting for Implementation Costs Incurred in a Cloud Computing Arrangement That is a Service Contract, requiring a customer in a cloud computing arrangement that is a service contract to follow the guidance in ASC 350-40 in determining the requirements for capitalizing implementation costs incurred to develop or obtain internal-use-software. The new guidance will be effective for emerging growth companies for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2020, and interim periods within annual periods beginning after December 15, 2021. Early adoption is permitted. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of adopting the new guidance on the consolidated financial statements.

 

In December 2019, the FASB issued ASU 2019-12, Income Taxes (Topic 740): Simplifying the Accounting for Income Taxes, which removes specific exceptions to the general principles in Topic 740 in GAAP. The new guidance also improves the issuer’s application of income tax-related guidance and simplifies GAAP for franchise taxes that are partially based on income, transactions with a government that result in a step up in the tax basis of goodwill, separate financial statements of legal entities that are not subject to tax, and enacted changes in tax laws in interim periods. The new guidance will be effective for emerging growth companies for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2021, and interim periods within fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2022; however, early adoption is permitted. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of adopting the new guidance on the consolidated financial statements.