Annual report pursuant to Section 13 and 15(d)

Significant Accounting Policies

v3.22.1
Significant Accounting Policies
12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2021
Accounting Policies [Abstract]  
SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

NOTE 2 – SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

Basis of Presentation

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States of America (“GAAP”) and pursuant to the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”).

Our operations are organized into a single business segment, which consists of pressure pumping services, and we have one reportable geographical business segment, the United States.

Reverse Stock Split

At the annual meeting of the Company’s stockholders held on May 14, 2021, the Company’s stockholders approved a proposal to amend the Company’s certificate of incorporation to effect a reverse stock split at a ratio to be determined by the Company’s Board of Directors within a specified range. On September 30, 2021, the Company effected a 1-for-3.5 reverse split of its Class A common stock. All owners of record as of September 30, 2021 received one issued and outstanding share of the Company’s Class A common stock in exchange for three and one half outstanding shares of the Company’s Class A common stock. No fractional shares of Class A common stock were issued as a result of the reverse stock split. Any fractional shares in connection with the reverse stock split were rounded up to the nearest whole share and no stockholders received cash in lieu of fractional shares. The reverse stock split had no impact on the number of shares of Class A common stock the Company is authorized to issue pursuant to its certificate of incorporation or on the par value per share of the Class A common stock. Proportional adjustments were made to the number of shares of Class A common stock issuable upon exercise or conversion of the Company's equity awards, convertible preferred stock and warrants, as well as the applicable exercise price. All share and per share information included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K has been retroactively adjusted to reflect the impact of the reverse stock split.

Principles of Consolidation

The consolidated financial statements comprise the financial statements of the Company and its wholly owned subsidiaries. Subsidiaries are fully consolidated from the date of acquisition, being the date on which the Company obtains control, and continue to be consolidated until the date when such control ceases. The financial statements of the subsidiaries are prepared for the same reporting period as the Company. All significant intercompany balances and transactions are eliminated upon consolidation.

Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the financial statements and accompanying notes. We regularly evaluate estimates and judgments based on historical experience and other relevant facts and circumstances. Significant estimates included in these financial statements primarily relate to allowance for doubtful accounts, allowance for inventory obsolescence, estimated useful lives and valuation of long-lived assets, impairment assessments of goodwill and other long-lived assets, estimates of fair value of warrant liabilities, term loan, and convertible senior notes, and the valuation of share-based compensation and certain equity instruments. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

Cash and Cash Equivalents

Cash equivalents are highly liquid investments with an original maturity at the date of acquisition of three months or less. Cash and cash equivalents consist of cash on deposit with domestic banks and, at times, may exceed federally insured limits.

Restricted Cash

Cash and cash equivalents that are restricted as to withdrawal or use under the terms of certain contractual agreements, or are reserved for a specific purpose, and not readily available for immediate or general use are recorded in restricted cash in our consolidated balance sheets. As of December 31, 2021, restricted cash consisted of $729 transferred into a trust account to support our workers’ compensation obligations and $2,007 for use in prepayment of the Senior Secured Term Loan. As of December 31, 2020, restricted cash consisted of $513 transferred into a trust account to support our workers’ compensation obligations and $1,056 for use in approved capital expenditures.

The following table provides a reconciliation of the amount of cash and cash equivalents and restricted cash reported on the consolidated balance sheets that sum to the total of the same amounts shown on the consolidated statements of cash flows:

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

6,384

 

 

$

3,693

 

Restricted cash

 

 

2,736

 

 

 

1,569

 

Cash and cash equivalents and restricted cash

 

$

9,120

 

 

$

5,262

 

Accounts Receivable

Accounts receivable are recorded at their outstanding balances adjusted for an allowance for doubtful accounts. The allowance for doubtful accounts is determined by analyzing the payment history and credit worthiness of each customer. Receivable balances are charged off when they are considered uncollectible by management. Recoveries of receivables previously charged off are recorded as income when received.

During the year ended December 31, 2021, the Company entered into an Assignment of Claim Agreement (the “Assignment”) with a third-party, whereby the Company transferred to the third-party all right, title, and interest in the Company’s claim in the amount of $14,470 in connection with a customer’s bankruptcy. The Assignment was for consideration of $2,478, which the Company received on April 26, 2021. During the first quarter of 2021, the Company wrote-off the related receivables of $12,000, which was the unrealized amount of the claim assigned and was previously reserved for in full as of December 31, 2020. As of December 31, 2021, the Company did not record an allowance for doubtful accounts.

The following table shows the change in allowance for doubtful accounts:

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

Balance at beginning of period

 

$

12,000

 

 

$

22

 

Charges to costs and expenses

 

 

9

 

 

 

12,031

 

Recoveries and write-offs

 

 

(12,009

)

 

 

(53

)

Balance at end of period

 

$

-

 

 

$

12,000

 

Inventory

Inventory consists of proppant, chemicals, and other consumable materials and supplies used in our pressure pumping operations. Inventories are stated at the lower of cost or net realizable value. Cost is determined principally on a first-in-first-out cost basis. All inventories are purchased for use by the Company in the delivery of its services with no inventory being sold separately to outside parties. Inventory quantities on hand are reviewed regularly and write-downs for obsolete inventory are recorded based on our forecast of the inventory item demand in the near future.

During the year ended December 31, 2021, the Company recorded $2,461 of reserves for losses on inventory obsolescence primarily related to conventional diesel parts. As of December 31, 2021 and 2020, the Company had established inventory reserves of $1,272 and $315, respectively, for obsolete and slow-moving inventory. The following table shows the change in the inventory reserves:

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

Balance at beginning of period

 

$

315

 

 

$

579

 

Charges to costs and expenses

 

 

2,461

 

 

 

620

 

Recoveries and write-offs

 

 

(1,504

)

 

 

(884

)

Balance at end of period

 

$

1,272

 

 

$

315

 

Assets Held for Sale

Assets that are classified as held for sale are measured at the lower of their carrying amount or fair value less expected selling costs (“estimated selling price”) with a loss recognized to the extent that the carrying amount exceeds the estimated selling price. The classification is applicable at the date upon which the sale of assets is probable and the assets are available for immediate sale in their present condition. Upon determining that an asset meets the criteria to be classified as held for sale, the Company ceases depreciation and reports the assets, if material, in assets held for sale in its consolidated balance sheets.

When the net carrying value of an asset designated as held for sale exceeds its estimated fair value, which we estimate based on the estimated selling price, we recognize the difference as an impairment charge. When an impairment charge is recorded, subsequent changes to the estimated selling price of assets held for sale are recorded as gains or losses to the consolidated statements of operations wherein the recognition of subsequent gains is limited to the cumulative loss previously recognized. During the year ended December 31, 2021, the Company recorded no impairment charges on its held for sale assets.

Property and Equipment

Property and equipment are carried at cost, with depreciation provided on a straight-line basis over their estimated useful lives. Expenditures for renewals and betterments that extend the lives of the assets are capitalized. Amounts spent for maintenance and repairs, which do not improve or extend the life of the related asset, are charged to expense as incurred.

The Company separately identifies and accounts for certain critical components of its pressure pumping units including the engine, transmission, and pump, which requires us to separately estimate the useful lives of these components. For our other service equipment, we do not separately identify and track depreciation of specific original components. When we replace components of these assets, we typically estimate the net book values of the components that are retired, which are based primarily upon their replacement costs, their ages, and their original estimated useful lives.

In the first quarter of 2020, our review of impairment of long-lived assets necessitated a review of the useful lives of our property and equipment. Current trends in pressure pumping equipment operating conditions, such as increasing treating pressures and higher pumping rates, along with the increase in daily pumping time are shortening the useful life of certain critical components we use. We determined that the average useful life of fluid ends and fuel injectors was less than one year, which resulted in our determination that costs associated with the replacement of these components would no longer be capitalized, but instead expensed as they are used in operations. This change in accounting estimate was made effective in March 2020 and accounted for prospectively.

Impairment of Long-lived Assets

Long-lived assets, such as property and equipment and amortizable identifiable intangible assets are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. When making this assessment, the following factors are considered: current operating results, trends, and prospects, as well as the effects of obsolescence, demand, competition, and other economic factors. We determine recoverability by evaluating whether the undiscounted estimated future net cash flows of the asset or asset group are less than its carrying value. When impairment is indicated, we proceed to Step 2 of the impairment test and measure the impairment as the amount by which the assets carrying value exceeds its fair value. Management considers several factors such as estimated future cash flows, appraisals, and current market value analysis in determining fair value. Assets are written down to fair value if the concluded current fair value is below the net carrying value. Impairment loss on long-lived assets of $147,543 was recorded during the first quarter of 2020 (refer to “Note 6 – Goodwill and Intangible Assets”). No impairment of long-lived assets was recorded for the year ended December 31, 2021.

Goodwill

Goodwill is not amortized, but is reviewed for impairment annually, or more frequently when events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value may not be recoverable. Judgements regarding indicators of potential impairment are based on market conditions and operational performance of the business.

As of December 31 of each year, or as required, the Company performs an impairment analysis of goodwill. The Company may assess its goodwill for impairment initially using a qualitative approach to determine whether conditions exist that indicate it is more likely than not that a reporting unit’s carrying value is greater than its fair value, and if such conditions are identified, then a quantitative analysis will be performed to determine if there is any impairment. The Company may also elect to perform a single step quantitative analysis in which the carrying amount of the reporting unit is compared to its fair value, which the Company estimates using a guideline public company method, a form of the market approach. The guideline public company method utilizes the trading multiples of similarly traded public companies as they relate to the Company’s operating metrics. An impairment charge would be recognized for the amount by which the carrying amount of the reporting unit exceeds the reporting unit’s fair value, and only limited to the total amount of goodwill allocated to the reporting unit.

Deferred Financing Costs

Costs incurred to obtain financing are capitalized and amortized to interest expense using the effective interest method over the contractual term of the debt. At the balance sheet date, deferred financing costs related to term loans are presented as a direct deduction from the debt liability, while deferred financing costs related to the revolver facility are presented as deferred financing costs, net, on the consolidated balance sheets.

Warrants

The Company evaluates all its financial instruments, including issued stock purchase warrants, to determine if such instruments are derivatives or contain features that qualify as embedded derivatives, pursuant to Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 480, Distinguishing Liabilities from Equity and ASC 815-15, Derivatives and Hedging—Embedded Derivatives. The classification of derivative instruments, including whether such instruments should be recorded as liabilities or equity is evaluated pursuant to ASC 815-40, Derivatives and Hedging—Contracts in Entity’s Own Equity.

The Company issued Public Warrants and Private Placement Warrants in connection with its initial public offering (the “IPO”) in November 2018. Additionally, the Company issued warrants to certain institutional investors in connection with the Company's private placement of Series A preferred stock on May 24, 2019 (“Series A Warrants,” and together with the Public Warrants and Private Placement Warrants, the “warrants”). As of December 31, 2021, all our outstanding warrants are recognized as liabilities. Accordingly, we recognize the warrant instruments as liabilities at fair value upon issuance and adjust the instruments to fair value at the end of each reporting period. Any change in fair value is recognized in our consolidated statements of operations. The Public Warrants are valued using their quoted market price since they are publicly traded and thus had an observable market price. The Private Placement Warrants are valued using a Monte Carlo simulation model. The Series A Warrants are valued using the Black-Scholes option pricing model.

Convertible Notes and Convertible Preferred Stock

When the Company issues convertible notes or convertible preferred stock, it first evaluates the balance sheet classification of the convertible instrument in its entirety to determine whether the instrument should be classified as a liability under ASC 480 and second whether the conversion feature should be accounted for separately from the host instrument. A conversion feature of a convertible note instrument or certain convertible preferred stock would be separated from the convertible instrument and classified as a derivative liability if the conversion feature, were it a standalone instrument, meets the definition of an “embedded derivative” in ASC 815-15. Generally, characteristics that require derivative treatment include, among others, when the conversion feature is not indexed to the Company’s equity, as defined in ASC 815-40, or when it must be settled either in cash or by issuing stock that is readily convertible to cash. When a conversion feature meets the definition of an embedded derivative, it would be separated from the host instrument and classified as a derivative liability carried on the consolidated balance sheet at fair value, with any changes in its fair value recognized in the consolidated statements of operations.

If a conversion feature does not meet the conditions to be separated and accounted for as an embedded derivative liability, the Company then determines whether the conversion feature is “beneficial”. A conversion feature would be considered beneficial if the conversion feature is “in the money” when the host instrument is issued or, under certain circumstances, at a later time. The beneficial conversion feature (“BCF”) for convertible instruments is recognized and measured by allocating a portion of the proceeds equal to the intrinsic value of that feature to additional paid-in capital. The intrinsic value is generally calculated at the commitment date as the difference between the conversion price and the fair value of the common stock or other securities into which the security is convertible, multiplied by the number of shares into which the security is convertible. If certain other securities are issued with the convertible security, the proceeds are allocated among the different components. The portion of the proceeds allocated to the convertible security is divided by the contractual number of the conversion shares to determine the effective conversion price, which is used to measure the BCF. The effective conversion price is used to compute the intrinsic value. The value of the BCF is limited to the basis that is initially allocated to the convertible security.

If the convertible note contains a BCF, the amount of the proceeds allocated to the BCF reduces the balance of the convertible note, creating a discount which is amortized over the note’s term to interest expense in the consolidated statements of operations.

When a convertible preferred stock contains a BCF, after allocating the proceeds to the BCF, the resulting discount is either amortized as deemed dividends over the period beginning when the convertible preferred stock is issued up to the earliest date the conversion feature may be exercised, or if the conversion feature is immediately exercisable, the discount is fully amortized at the date of issuance.

Fair Value of Preferred Stock

The fair value of Series A preferred stock at the date of issuance was estimated by calculating the present value of its one-year redemption cost to the Company and then discounted for lack of marketability.

The fair value of Series B preferred stock is the stated value, which is equal to the proceeds received from issuance.

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

Fair value is defined under ASC 820, Fair Value Measurement, as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. ASC 820 also establishes a three-level hierarchy, which requires an entity to maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs when measuring fair value. The three levels are defined as follows:

Level 1–inputs are quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities.
Level 2–inputs other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly.
Level 3–inputs are unobservable for the asset or liability.

The following is a summary of the carrying amounts and estimated fair values of our financial instruments:

Senior Secured Term Loan. The fair value of the Senior Secured Term Loan is $106,620 and $198,000 as of December 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively, based on the market price quoted from external sources. If the Senior Secured Term Loan was measured at fair value in the financial statements, it would be classified as Level 2 in the fair value hierarchy.

Equipment financing. The carrying value of the equipment financing notes approximates fair value as its terms are consistent with and comparable to current market rates as of December 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively.

Warrants. As of December 31, 2021, the Company’s outstanding warrants are accounted for as liabilities and measured at fair value. See “Note 9 – Warrant Liabilities” for fair value measurements associated with the Company’s warrants.

Convertible Senior Notes. As of December 31, 2021, the fair value of the Convertible Senior Notes is $73,538, based on an option pricing framework using a lattice model. If the Convertible Senior Notes were measured at fair value in the financial statements, they would be classified as Level 2 in the fair value hierarchy.

Revenue Recognition

The Company recognizes revenue based on the customer’s ability to benefit from the services rendered in an amount that reflects the consideration expected to be received in exchange for those services, pursuant to ASC 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers. The Company’s revenues consist of providing pressure pumping services for either a pre-determined term or number of stages/wells to E&P companies operating in the onshore oil and natural gas basins of the United States. In the performance of these services, and at the request of our customers, we may also provide consumables such as chemicals and sand. Revenues are earned as services are rendered, which is generally on a per stage basis, per hour rate basis or daily rate basis. Customers are invoiced according to contract terms, which is generally upon the completion of a well or monthly with payment due typically 30 days from invoice date.

The Company’s performance obligations are satisfied over time, typically measured by the number of stages completed or the number of pumping days a fleet is available to pump for a customer in a month. All revenue is recognized when a contract with a customer exists, collectability of amounts subject to invoice is probable, the performance obligations under the contract have been satisfied over time, and the amount to which the Company has the right to invoice has been determined. A portion of the Company’s contracts contain variable consideration; however, this variable consideration is typically unknown at the time of contract inception, and is not known until the job is complete, at which time the variability is resolved.

The Company has elected to use the “as invoiced” practical expedient to recognize revenue based upon the amount it has a right to invoice upon the completion of each performance obligation per the terms of the contract. The practical expedient permits an entity to recognize revenue in the amount to which it has a right to invoice the customer if that amount corresponds directly with the value to the customer of the entity’s performance completed to date. The Company believes that this is an accurate reflection of the value transferred to the customer as each incremental obligation is performed.

The Company has elected to expense sales commissions paid upon the successful signing of a new customer contract as incurred if the related contract will be fully satisfied within one year. For contracts that will not be fully satisfied within one year, these incremental costs of obtaining a contract with a customer will be recognized as a contract asset and amortized on a straight-line basis over the life of the contract.

Patent License Sales. On June 24, 2021, the Company issued a Convertible Senior Note (See “Note 10 – Convertible Senior Notes”) convertible into a patent license agreement. On June 29, 2021, the holder exercised its right to convert the Convertible Senior Note in full and the Company entered into a Patent License Agreement (the “License Agreement”), which provides the licensee a five-year option to purchase up to 20 licenses to build and operate electric fleets using the Company’s patented Clean Fleet® technology (the “licenses”). Upon entry into the License Agreement, the Company sold three licenses to build and operate three electric fleets, each valued at $7,500.

The sales of the right to use the Company’s patented Clean Fleet® technology is a single performance obligation. The Company recognizes the income associated with the patent license sales at the point in time when the Company satisfies its performance obligation by granting the purchaser the right to use the patented Clean Fleet® technology and transfer of control has occurred. The patent license sales are recognized as other income in our consolidated statement of operations.

Major Customer and Concentration of Credit Risk

The concentration of our customers in the oil and natural gas industry may impact our overall exposure to credit risk, either positively or negatively, in that customers may be similarly affected by changes in economic and industry conditions. We perform ongoing credit evaluations of our customers and do not generally require collateral in support of our trade receivables.

The following table shows the percentage of revenues from our significant customers:

 

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

 

2021

 

2020

Customer A

 

*

 

11.2%

Customer B

 

*

 

19.7%

Customer C

 

14.1%

 

18.4%

Customer E

 

15.5%

 

13.2%

Customer F

 

20.8%

 

18.2%

 

 

 

 

 

An asterisk indicates that revenue is less than ten percent.

 

The following table shows the percentage of trade receivables from our significant customers:

 

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

 

2021

 

2020

Customer B

 

*

 

32.2%

Customer C

 

20.4%

 

17.0%

Customer F

 

24.3%

 

12.7%

Customer G

 

*

 

12.5%

Customer H

 

*

 

13.5%

Customer J

 

29.7%

 

*

Customer K

 

25.0%

 

*

 

 

 

 

 

An asterisk indicates that trade receivable is less than ten percent.

Share-Based Compensation

Share-based compensation is measured on the grant date and fair value is recognized as expense over the requisite service period, which is generally the vesting period of the award. The Company recognizes forfeitures as they occur rather than estimating expected forfeitures.

The fair value of time-based restricted stock, deferred stock units, or other performance incentive awards is determined based on the number of shares or units granted and the closing price of Class A common stock on the date of grant. The fair value of stock options is determined by applying the Black-Sholes model on the grant-date market value of the underlying Class A common stock.

Deferred compensation expense associated with liability-based awards, such as certain performance incentive awards that could be settled either in cash or through issuance of a variable number of shares based on a fixed monetary amount at inception, is recognized at the fixed monetary amount at inception and is amortized on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period, which is generally the vesting period. However, the Company considers any delayed settlement as a post-vesting restriction which impacts the determination of the grant-date fair value of the award. The Company estimates fair value by using a risk-adjusted discount rate, which reflects the weighted average cost of capital of similarly traded public companies.

Income Taxes

The Company, under ASC 740, Accounting for Income Taxes, uses the asset and liability method of accounting for income taxes, under which deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences of (i) temporary differences between the financial statement carrying amounts and the tax bases of existing assets and liabilities and (ii) operating loss and tax credit carryforwards. Deferred income tax assets and liabilities are based on enacted tax rates applicable to the future period when those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect of a change in tax rates on deferred tax assets and liabilities is recognized in income in the period the rate change is enacted. A valuation allowance is provided for deferred tax assets when it is more likely than not the deferred tax assets will not be realized. Our deferred tax calculation and valuation allowance requires us to make certain estimates about future operations. Changes in state or federal tax laws, as well as changes in our financial condition or the carrying value of existing assets and liabilities, could affect those estimates. The effect of a change in tax rates is recognized as income or expense in the period that the rate is enacted.

ASC 740 prescribes a recognition threshold and a measurement attribute for the financial statement recognition and measurement of tax positions taken or expected to be taken in a tax return. For those benefits to be recognized, a tax position must be more-likely-than-not to be sustained upon examination by taxing authorities. The Company recognizes accrued interest and penalties related to unrecognized tax benefits as income tax expense. No amounts were accrued for the payment of interest and penalties at December 31, 2021. The Company is currently not aware of any issues under review that could result in significant payments, accruals, or material deviation from its position. The Company is subject to income tax examinations by major taxing authorities since inception.